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Assess the effectiveness of using Virtual Reality for caregiver training

Assess the effectiveness of using Virtual Reality for caregiver training

Urban Health Pathway Seed Grant. PI: Ming Tang. Partner. Council of Ageing, LiveWell Collaborative. $19,844. 03. 2021-3.2022

This project aims to investigate the effectiveness of using Virtual Reality to build empathy for the care recipient by allowing the caregiver to experience day-to-day life from the care recipient’s perspective. Ming Tang leads a research team to work with COA and LiveWell Collaborative to develop and evaluate an expandable set of VR training modules designed to help train family and friends who are thrust into the caregiving role.

COA is rewardeded $25,000 from the CTA Foundation Grant to sustain the project.

In the UC News. share point.

VR for Police Training

Active Shooter

Develop several fully immersive 3D VR active shooter scenarios that can run on cost-effective commercially available VR hardware.

Develop and Assess Active Shooter Virtual Reality Training for Ohio Law Enforcement.  PI: J.C Barnes. Co-PI: Tang Office of Criminal Justice Services. $50,000. 09. 2020-09.2021 ( $29,608)

Development of a Virtual Reality Augmented Violence Reduction Training System for Active and Mass Shooting incidents. PI: Ed Latessa. Co-PIs: J.C. Barnes, Ming Tang, Cory Haberman, Dan Gerard, Tim Sabransky. $10,000. Start-up fund. UC Digital Futures anchor tenant cohort.

Checklist

Using Checklists and Virtual Reality to Improve Police Investigations. Collaborative Research Advancement Grants. UC. $25,000. PI: Haberman. Co-PI: Tang, Barnes. Period: 07.2020-01.2022.

Team:

Ming Tang, Cory Haberman, J.C. Barnes, Cheryl Jonson, Dongrui Zhu, Heejin Lee, Jillian Desmond, Ruby Qiu, Snigdha Bhattiprolu, Rishyak Kommineni

 

 

paper published in inForma

Ming Tang’s paper “Architectural visualization in the age of mixed reality” is published by the architectural journal inForma.

Tang, Ming. 2018. “Architectural Visualization in the Age of Mixed Reality.” informa 11: 82–87.

Having been a promising visualization tool since the 1950s, ironically, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) were not widely used in the architectural design and evaluation process due to the high cost of equipment and complicated programming process required. However, with the recent development of head-mounted displays (HMD) such as Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Microsoft HoloLens, and easy-to-use game engines, both VR and AR are being reintroduced as Mixed Reality (MR) instruments into the design industry. This paper explores research related to VR concepts “essential copy” and “physical transcendence” (Bicocca, Levy. 1995), and their use in architectural design studios at the University of Cincinnati. We explored various methods to integrate MR in the architectural design process. This paper discusses two main aspects: (1) how to integrate MR into the design process as a design instrument, and (2) how to valuate MR methods for communicating architectural data, based on the workflow efficiency, rendering quality and users’ feedback.

This issue “Hybrid Realities“of inForma explores architectural discourse by looking at how twenty-first century economic, academic, technological and political shifts have set up conditions for architectural hybridity. We define ‘hybrid’ as points of convergence between different ‘breeds’, resulting in the creation of dynamic architectures and frameworks. Parting from the premise that disciplinary and theoretical crossovers can produce alternate readings and conceptualisations of space, ‘Hybrid Realities’ seeks to discuss the effectual offsprings between two different components, wether typological, disciplinary, idealistic, or others. Similarly, it aims at discussing works and research which places these crossovers in a wider, contextual discussion representative of our current moment in time. Borrowing ‘hybrid’ from biology, the issue situates it within the discussion of the built environment to challenge notions of architectural singularity and highlight the diverse ways in which the field is expanding.  

Interview featured at the Building Design + Construction magazine

Ming Tang’s interview was featured in the article “The human touch“, by David Malone, editor of the Building Design + Construction magazine. Vol. 31. 04. 2018. The issue is about the TECH REPORT 5.0: Cognitive Architecture, Artificial Intelligence, Real-time Rendering, Digital Media.  Tang discussed the emerging research on eye-tracking and way-finding in Architecture and interior design.