publication in Urban Rail Transit journal

Paper accepted in the upcoming Urban Rail Transit journal 2019.

Tang, M., Auffrey, C. Advanced Digital Tools for Updating Overcrowded Rail Stations: Using Eye-Tracking, Virtual Reality, and Crowd Simulation to Support Design Decision-making. Urban Rail Transit. 2019.

 

This paper describes an innovative integration of eye-tracking (ET) with virtual reality (VR), and details the application of these combined technologies for the adaptive reuse redesign of the Wudaokou rail station in Beijing. The objective of the research is to develop a hybrid approach, combining ET and VR technologies, as part of an experimental study of how to improve wayfinding and pedestrian movement in crowded environments such as those found in urban subway stations during peak hours. Using ET analysis, design features such as edges, and color contrast are used to evaluate several proposed rail station redesigns. Through VR and screen-based ET, visual attention and related spatial responses are tracked and analyzed for the selected redesign elements. This paper assesses the potential benefits of using ET and VR to assist identification of station design elements that will improve wayfinding and pedestrian movement, and describes how the combination of VR and ET can influence the design process. The research concludes that the combination of VR and ET offers unique advantages for modeling how the design of rail transit hub interiors can influence the visual attention and movement behavior of those using the redesigned station.  This is especially true for crowded conditions in complex interior spaces. The use of integrated ET and VR technology is shown to inform innovative design approaches for facilitating improved wayfinding and pedestrian movement within redesigned rail stations.

Check out Tang’s eye-tracking research with transit hub design studio ARCH4002, Spring 2018.

Navigating the New Longevity Symposium

Prof. Ming Tang was invited as a panelist and presented his Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality research projects at the Navigating the New Longevity Symposium organized by the Village Chicago on November 7. The symposium topic is “How Will Virtual Reality Change Your Future?”

The Village Chicago organized a lively discussion of how immersion technology is changing the way we live, learn and care, a conversation exploring how immersion technology is transforming our well-being at all ages and stages of life – and be inspired to suggest new ways it can be put to use. Panelists include Neelum T. Aggarwal, M.D.; Carrie Shaw, CEO, Embodied Labs; Ming Tang, RA University of Cincinnati; and Emily Phelps, medical student of Rush University Medical Center.

Carrie Shaw, CEO, Embodied Labs presented at the symposium.

paper published in inForma

Ming Tang’s paper “Architectural visualization in the age of mixed reality” is published by the architectural journal inForma.

Tang, Ming. 2018. “Architectural Visualization in the Age of Mixed Reality.” informa 11: 82–87.

Having been a promising visualization tool since the 1950s, ironically, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) were not widely used in the architectural design and evaluation process due to the high cost of equipment and complicated programming process required. However, with the recent development of head-mounted displays (HMD) such as Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Microsoft HoloLens, and easy-to-use game engines, both VR and AR are being reintroduced as Mixed Reality (MR) instruments into the design industry. This paper explores research related to VR concepts “essential copy” and “physical transcendence” (Bicocca, Levy. 1995), and their use in architectural design studios at the University of Cincinnati. We explored various methods to integrate MR in the architectural design process. This paper discusses two main aspects: (1) how to integrate MR into the design process as a design instrument, and (2) how to valuate MR methods for communicating architectural data, based on the workflow efficiency, rendering quality and users’ feedback.

This issue “Hybrid Realities“of inForma explores architectural discourse by looking at how twenty-first century economic, academic, technological and political shifts have set up conditions for architectural hybridity. We define ‘hybrid’ as points of convergence between different ‘breeds’, resulting in the creation of dynamic architectures and frameworks. Parting from the premise that disciplinary and theoretical crossovers can produce alternate readings and conceptualisations of space, ‘Hybrid Realities’ seeks to discuss the effectual offsprings between two different components, wether typological, disciplinary, idealistic, or others. Similarly, it aims at discussing works and research which places these crossovers in a wider, contextual discussion representative of our current moment in time. Borrowing ‘hybrid’ from biology, the issue situates it within the discussion of the built environment to challenge notions of architectural singularity and highlight the diverse ways in which the field is expanding.  

AR & VR for “future transportation” show at the UC 1819 innovation hub

Our Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality exhibition in the 1819 Innovation Hub Grand Opening Celebration at the Unversity of Cincinnati. October 5th. 2018. SAID, SOD from DAAP participated the exhibition. Thanks for the support from DAAP CGC, and student volunteers!

VR projects from Ming Tang’s ARCH studio “future transportation hub” in SAID, and AR prototype for holographic interactive visualization controlled by a remote user interface.

Check out the video captured onsite. Augmented Reality in Hololens controlled by a remote computer.

 

Low Carbon City

Shenzhen Center for Design. ALCCA parallel research Grant. China. Team: Ming Tang, Chris Auffrey, Xinhao Wang, Mingming Lu, Zhou Yan. Students: Desai Sagar, Reinersman Michael, Davis Seth, Block Olga. 2015

This academic research project is organized by the Shenzhen Center for Design and conducted in parallel to the Alternatives for Low Carbon City and Architecture (ALCCA) planning and design competition. This research project brings together professors, researchers, and students from multiple international universities from the region and around the world: Shenzhen University, University of Hong Kong, Columbia University, University of Cincinnati, the University of Syracuse, and Harvard University. Each research team is tasked to produce one ‘User’s Manual’ about specific topics involved in the planning, design, and implementation of low carbon urban development. These ‘Manuals’ aims to provide substantiated knowledge and innovative ideas for the discussion of the environmental, economic, social, and cultural issues surrounding low carbon projects in Shenzhen and the rest of the world.

Web Applications

The goal of this research is to construct a relational model allowing developers to better understand the complex relationships among various urban parameters such as population, density, carbon emission, car usage, development intensity, zoning and energy consumption. The use of dynamic / parametric modeling has allowed us to compare the advantages and disadvantages of underground, surface, and vertical development, as well as different transportation and building densities and coverages, and to propose an optimal strategy for new infrastructure development and land use. We believe the great challenge for the PINGDI1.1 project is to create evaluation systems that can quantify various parameters of the urban built environment, and ensure a low carbon lifestyle for all residents though various scenarios including iterative proposals on urban infrastructure, land use, building programs, waste management, renewable energy and transportation systems.

Step 1: Construct measurable Low carbon indicators
Low carbon indicators from various aspects were proposed. These indicators will be very helpful in establishing an eco-city performance monitoring system for the low carbon city. Step 2: Construct Assumptions
Quantifiable Relationships were established based on the following assumptions of the PINGDI low carbon city starting zone.

  • Population density
  • Industrial space requirement
  • Carbon emission per employee by industry (ton/person) 
  • Energy consumption rates per area by industry sector (J/sq.m.)
  • Commercial/office space requirement (square meters per employee):
    • Residential
    • Energy consumption rate per residential area (J/sq.m.)
    • Carbon emission rate per residential area (ton/sq.m)
    • Water consumption
    • Waste water generation
    • Municipal waste generation
  • Storm water runoff
      • Proportion impervious area
  • Automobile carbon emission rate (ton/km)
    • Assumption of surface parking
  • Transit carbon emission rate (ton/km)
  • Percentage by travel modes
  • Total distance travelled per person (km)
  • Carbon sequestration rates (ton/sq.m)

Step 3: Construct site database

A digital model of PINGDI site is constructed using advanced parametric modeling tools, which includes block and building.  Street network, Land use type by block, FAR, Building height, Building use type, and other parameters will be coded into database allowing further computing. Three scenarios named as high-density development, mid-density development, low-density development were constructed.

4. Scenario based analysis

We offer a brief discussion of each concept below along with example illustrations of their application. The parametric modeling results are analyzed based on low-carbon city criteria related to various service including school, healthcare, recreation, commercial and parks.

Conclusion

The conclusions are made based on the analysis of various scenarios based on the GIS scenario 360 program in the relation to the low carbon planning methods. Final Report download (PDF)