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Paper in AHFE conference

Nancy Daraiseh, Ming Tang, Mikhail Nikolaenko . Using Virtual Reality to Enhance Behavioral Staff Training for Interacting with Aggressive Psychiatric Patients. The 15th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE 2024). Nice, France, July 24-27, 2024.

Objective: To conduct a pilot study to enhance staff training and confidence when interacting with aggressive psychiatric patients using a virtual reality (VR) training module depicting an escalating patient scenario.

Significance: Dysregulated emotional outbursts, reactive aggression, and self-injurious behaviors are common in psychiatrically hospitalized patients. These behaviors result in aggressive patient interactions (APIs) which are associated with increased risk of harm to the patient and staff. Minimal research has examined interventions for successful training to effectively reduce or prevent API events and subsequent harm. Despite intensive, standardized trainings in crisis de-escalation protocols, staff continue to experience high rates of API injuries. More realistic training and competency in a safe environment to practice implementation and utilization of de-escalation strategies to avoid APIs and patient harm are needed.

Methods Using a pre – post, quasi-experimental design, 40 Behavioral Health Specialists and Registered Nurses at a pediatric psychiatric facility will participate in VR training depicting a commonly experienced scenario when interacting with an aggressive patient. Participants are stratified by job experience, sex, and VR experience. Study aims are to: i) assess the feasibility and usability of VR training among this population and ii) obtain measures of learner satisfaction and performance. Surveys measure usability, learner satisfaction, and coping with patient aggression. Pre- and post-performance in training will be compared and assessed by percent correct answers on the first attempt; time to correct answer; and the number of successful and unsuccessful attempts.

Preliminary Results (full analyses in progress): Preliminary survey results (N=14) show that 64% perceived the VR experience to be consistent with their real-world experiences: 87% agree that the VR training would help with interactions with aggressive patients: 71% reported the training was effective in identifying de-escalation strategies: 79% stated the training was effective in recognizing stages of patient crisis; training included important skills used in their job; and would recommend the training. Finally, 100% would participate in future VR trainings.

Anticipated Conclusions: We plan to show that using VR to supplement in-place training programs for high-risk situations can improve users’ understanding of essential de-escalation and crisis techniques. We anticipate results will show an enhanced ability and confidence when interacting with aggressive patients. Future studies will expand on results and examine implications on staff and patient harm. 

Check more information on the  VR-based Employee Safety Training. Therapeutic Crisis Intervention Simulation 

paper on JEC

Paper accepted in the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Cory P. Haberman, Ming Tang, JC Barnes, Clay Driscoll, Bradley J. O’Guinn, Calvin Proffit, The Effect of Checklists on Evidence Collection During Initial Investigations A Randomized Controlled Trial in Virtual Reality. Journal of Experimental Criminology

Objective To examine the impact of an investigative checklist on evidence collection by police officers responding to a routine burglary investigation.

Methods A randomized control trial was conducted in virtual reality to test the effectiveness of an investigative checklist. Officers in the randomly assigned treatment group (n = 25) were provided with a checklist during the simulated investigation. Officers in the control group (n = 26) did not have access to the checklist at any time. The checklist included five evidence items commonly associated with burglary investigations.

Results Officers who were randomly provided with an investigative checklist were significantly more likely to collect two evidence items located outside of the virtual victim’s home. Both treatment and control officers were about equally as likely to collect three evidence items located inside the residence.

Conclusions Investigative checklists represent a promising new tool officers can use to improve evidence collection during routine investigations. More research is needed, however, to determine whether checklists improve evidence collection or case clearances in real-life settings. Virtual reality simulations provide a promising tool for collecting data in otherwise difficult or complex situations to simulate

Keywords: Investigations, Burglary, Checklists, Policing, Experiment, Randomized controlled trial

more information on this VR police training project available here. 

Cincinnati Public Radio interview

our EVRTalk story goes live on Cincinnati Public Radio!

Ming Tang (UC) and Jai’La Nored, Anna Goubeaux, and Antoinette Moore (Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio) were interviewed by Ann Thompson. WVXU, Cincinnati Public Radio. 

VR headsets put caregivers in the shoes of those they are assisting. By Ann Thompson. WVXU, Cincinnati Public Radio. 01.02.2023.

Live on Cincinnati Public Radio on January 2nd at 6:44 am. 8:44 am and 5:44 pm

(from left) Jai’La Nored, Anna Goubeaux, UC’s Ming Tang and Antoinette Moore.

Focus On Technology
Mondays at 6:44 a.m. and 8:44 a.m. during Morning Edition and 5:44 p.m. during All Things Considered.

Thanks for the support from COA, Live Well Collaborative, and the University of Cincinnati Urban Health Pathway grant

Check more information on the EVRTalk  program.

Thanks to Suzanne Burke, Ken Wilson, Jai’La Nored, Anna Goubeaux, and many others from COA. Thanks to the Live Well EVRTalk development team (Faculty: Ming Tang, Matt Anthony; advisor: Craig Vogel, Linda Dunseath; Students and Live Well fellows: Tosha Bapat, Karly Camerer, Jay Heyne, Harper Lamb, Jordan Owens, Ruby Qji, Alejandro Robledo, Matthew Spoleti, Lauren Southwood, Ryan Tinney, Keeton Yost, Dongrui Zhu.)

o4a AAA Partnership Award

2022 Outstanding AAA Partnership Award of the Year

 

On behalf of COA and Live Well, Ken Wilson (COA) and Ming Tang (UC)  received the AAA Award at the o4a conference. 10.20.2022. It is my great honor to represent Live Well as the co-recipient with the Council on Aging to receive the 2022 Ohio Association of Area Agencies on Aging Annual Partnership Award. Thanks to Suzanne Burke, Ken Wilson, Jai’La Nored, Anna Goubeaux, and many others from COA. Thanks to the Live Well EVRTalk development team (Faculty: Ming Tang, Matt Anthony; advisor: Craig Vogel, Linda Dunseath; Students and Live Well fellows: Tosha Bapat, Karly Camerer, Jay Heyne, Harper Lamb, Jordan Owens, Ruby Qji, Alejandro Robledo, Matthew Spoleti, Lauren Southwood, Ryan Tinney, Keeton Yost, Dongrui Zhu.)

Link: LWC Twitter

Therapeutic Crisis Intervention Simulation

VR-based Employee Safety Training. Therapeutic Crisis Intervention Simulation 

Grant:

  1. Virtual Reality for Employee Safety Training. Phase I. Sponsored research by the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. PI. Ming Tang. $16,631. Period: 6.2022- 09.2022.
  2. Virtual Reality for Employee Safety Training.Therapeutic Crisis Intervention Simulation-Phase II.  Sponsored research by the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. PI. Tang. $22,365. Period: 2.2023- 12.2023.

Under the leadership of Ming Tang, the XR-Lab is collaborating with the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) to develop a VR-based simulation to enhance employee safety training. This initiative involves creating a virtual hospital environment with AI-controlled characters to facilitate research on diverse scenarios encountered during therapeutic crisis interventions. A vital feature of this simulation is the VR dialogue between a staff member and a teenage patient exhibiting aggressive behavior and mental illness. The primary objective is to equip staff members with the necessary skills to de-escalate tense situations effectively and adhere to appropriate protocols, thereby ensuring a safer and more controlled environment for staff and patients.

Team:

  • Ming Tang, Nancy Daraiseh, Maurizio Macaluso, Krista Keehn, Harley Davis, Aaron Vaughn, Katheryn Haller,  Joseph Staneck, Emily Oehler
  • Employee Safety Learning Lab, CCHMC
  • Extended Reality (XR) Lab, UC

Field of research: Virtual Reality, Safety Training, Therapeutic Crisis Intervention, Mental Health,  Human Behavior Simulation

screenshots from  Mobile VR Quest 2 headset.