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We constructed our model at roughly 1/6”=1” scale. It was made out of 40 layers of laser-cut 2mm corrugated plastic, out of which were cut parametric holes which were slightly distorted squares with the approximate dimensions of 1”x1”. Added on top of these layers was a layer of plexi-glass for stability. The layers were glued together with an epoxy. 1/16” holes were drilled through vertically to thread wires. Some of these wires merely cinched the layers together while others served the double purpose of suspending the cloud. To cinch the layers, metal wire stops were soldered onto the wire on either side of the model. Inserted at the top of each column formed by the layers was acoustical foam, the idea being that in a full-scale model, sound waves would travel up these columns and be dispersed by the foam. We suspended the whole model inside of a wooden frame to best display its lighting qualities. The construction of this cloud, besides dimensions of material, would not vary at full scale.

Tidal Wall

AJ Suever | Rebecca Doughty | Mary Wischmeyer | Theresa Bort

We approached the design of this partition intending to create two different localized functions and aesthetics, one on each side of the wall. One side serves as a structural frame for the eight foot partition. Its flat regularized surface provides pin up and critique space, while absorbing extraneous sound through the concavity of the cones on that side. The other side is intended to trap sound in a larger group setting. The surface is made up of a series of varying convex cones, which provide significant depth variation to trap sound.

Our group experimented with reactive forms in Maya, building cones that opened and extended based on their proximity to a chosen point. We set the point at eye level so the visual gradient will have the most effect on the viewer. We then refined the design using paneling tools in Rhino to create a more regularized design that grows radially outward from that same point. The red octagons play off the red beams in Niehoff Studio and provide a visual spine that anchors the evolving white pyramids.

Honeycomb Partition Description: Michelle Rush, London Huenefeld, Alex Riordan

The model of our partition was constructed at roughly 1/8”=1” scale. It was built with laser-cut 1/16″ chip board.  The form of the partition consisted of parametric (slightly distorted) hexagons which were the faces to the tube-like hexagon structures underneath.  The tube-like structures were stacked within one another to make for an easy assembly.  For the sake of the model we used glue as a connector, but the idea for the real partition was to have bolts so that the pieces don’t slide and fall.  The wall itself was not entirely vertical, in fact it had an extremely undulating form.  This made for some very unique shapes that (for the model) were scored chipboard that we folded to make the hexagonal tube-like structures.  In real like the wall was thought to be made out of some type of metal and felt – the felt would help control the acoustics within the crit space as well as serve a secondary purpose as pinup material.  Certain parts of the wall were to be more flat while others more undulating to create an intriguing partition that also hit both major improvements the studio staff were looking for.

Acoustacks: Jessie Werbeach, Erin Kline, Bo Hubbard, Paul Conover

We constructed our model at roughly 1/6”=1” scale. It was made out of 40 layers of laser-cut 2mm corrugated plastic, out of which were cut parametric holes which were slightly distorted squares with the approximate dimensions of 1”x1”. Added on top of these layers was a layer of plexi-glass for stability. The layers were glued together with an epoxy. 1/16” holes were drilled through vertically to thread wires. Some of these wires merely cinched the layers together while others served the double purpose of suspending the cloud. To cinch the layers, metal wire stops were soldered onto the wire on either side of the model. Inserted at the top of each column formed by the layers was acoustical foam, the idea being that in a full-scale model, sound waves would travel up these columns and be dispersed by the foam. We suspended the whole model inside of a wooden frame to best display its lighting qualities. The construction of this cloud, besides dimensions of material, would not vary at full scale.

Honeycomb Partition update

My team has been working on the construction of our wall and how to connect the individual honeycombs. We chose laser cutting as our method of cutting the pieces , laying out an exploded 2d template for each hexagon. Then we folded each and glued the hexagon on the end of the form.The pieces fit together side by side and on top of each other to form the wall, some hexagons leave apertures and others close for pin-up space and acoustics.

Portion of assembled wall

Not much modification was needed in order to construct our conceptual wall.

Niehoff Project Short Description

This project is a cloud installation with our goal being to preserve the amount of light in the space while improving the acoustic qualities. A playful interaction between light and form drove us to want to design something that would react to the artificial light that would have an outcome that would aid in the acoustics in the studio while experimenting with a playful interaction between light and form. Taking direction from the light the farther away the form is from the lights the deeper the shape extends, much like a parabola. Due to its placement in between the strips of light, the cloud is symmetrical on its longitudinal axis. The material for the main structure is homasote, a structural fiberboard product. Homasote is known for its benefits concerning sound control. The material for the middle layer is chipboard. The chipboard can be scored to conform to the waffle structure and provides a large amount of surface area for the skin to be pinned to. The bottom layer is the fabric layer, projected as felt. Felt is wool that has been matted and condensed by pressing the fibers. While some types of felt are very soft, some are tough enough to form construction materials. We chose felt because it is a thick, natural fiber that is pliable yet easily controlled. The felt is offset from the chipboard slightly, so as to create another dimension to the pattern created.

Nick Hansman, Laura Soria, Luke Diewald, Rebecca Waters

Michelle Rush’s Individual Paper

Michelle Rush
G.I.S. Presentation Explanation
12 April, 2013

G.I.S. has a lot of capabilities, both basic and advanced (particularly when paired with other programs such as Rhinoceros).  It is fairly simple to learn and use and is often utilized by Urban or City Planners as a tool to layer, compare, and contrast the demographics of a particular region, city, neighborhood, or block.  The path I chose to demonstrate and discuss in our presentation involved layering multiple groups of data on top of one another, which essentially roots new information.

I chose to address the availability (and in turn the lack there-of) of certain public services to various residential areas of within Cincinnati.  We, as a group, narrowed our research region to downtown and a surrounding radius that reaches to just above Campus.

The initial demographics I chose were the locations of schools, daycares, and youth clubs throughout the city.  I labeled them as different (also brightly) colored dots so they are easy to see and compare with one another.  After scrolling around the page, it came to my attention that there were three different conditions occurring all on one map.  In one condition there were some areas that had rather large quantities of these facilities clustered extremely closely together.  In the second condition, the facilities did not even come remotely close to one another, and the third condition shows a pretty well-balanced spread.  This was pretty standard information, so I wanted to take it a step further by layering one more demographic underneath of all of these: the density of population per block.  This would allow me to really examine the areas which have appropriate access to such public facilities as well as the areas which more of a trek to make to reach one.

The results of this test were very interesting.  I found that certain neighborhoods with extremely dense population per block have hardly any access to public facilities like the ones in question, while other areas that are substantially more sparsely populated have clusters of said facilities.

Statistics like these are precisely the reason city and urban planners utilize G.I.S. Programs; they can layer information (exactly like I did) to determine how to create a better balance of things like residences, businesses, parks, public facilities, etc. within various neighborhoods.  The research I conducted proves as an illogical issue that eventually needs to be solved so that everyone in Cincinnati can have the same, simple accessibility to schools, daycares, or youth clubs as someone on the other side of town.  This creates happier residents and a more efficient urban system which is the ultimate goal of every urban or city planner.

Unit Construction Process

For the final presentation our group of myself, Sam Carl and Chris Rivalsky made two different models to show the model at different scales. First we made a small scale model of the entire construction, this was made out of four layers of museum board laser cut and then layers to make the system for our construction.

Additionally we built a model of a piece of the construction at a larger scale to see how the construction process would work. This construction was made of two CNC cut pieces of plywood, with a fabric layer between the two.

While we did not finalize the connection between the units we were thinking we would use some type of metal ring that would allow the units to move independently of each other in more than on direction.

Niehoff Project Description

The HoneyDome is a cloud device that is hung from the ceiling to absorb and control the bouncing of sound around a room.  The design is comprised of hexagons used in a honeycomb pattern.  Domes of various sizes have been inserted into each hexagon as a means of increasing the surface area of the cloud.  As the surface area increases the opportunity of the piece to absorb sound also increases.  The hexagons were then put into Rhino and used to populate a curve, which again increased the surface area of the cloud.  Because of its porous characteristics felt was chosen as the material to line the interior of the domes.  The porous nature of the felt allows for more absorption of sound.  The hexagon pieces are made of cardboard which is ideal because of its lightweight and cost effective qualities.  Each row of the cloud is bolted together with lighter weight plastic bolts and then hung separately from the ceiling.  This allows for the cloud to appear as one entity when hung without becoming unstable and falling apart.  When hung in the Niehoff Studio the HoneyDome will help reduce the bouncing of sound and create a space in which critiques and small group discussions can be more productive.  As the excess sound is absorbed the echo effect that currently exists will stop and you will be able to hear the conversations of those around you while the conversations of other groups will be silenced.

Lydia Witte

Katie Honneywell

Emmey Jensen

Nora Begin

Jill Blakey, Joyce Hanlon, Christine Carlo, Evan Baum Niehoff Installation Description

Niehoff Installation Description

Our team chose to address the acoustic problems the Niehoff Design Studio was facing by creating a suspended cloud form. By manipulating a line into a wave-like form in the parametric design software, Maya, the frame fork for our cloud covering was achieved. A series of ribs were then arrayed along this path to create a waffling effect, which helps to create a more acoustically stable atmosphere for the studio and a more stable construction for suspension above the space. The three structural supports are to be made out of glulam wood in order to achieve the bends in the supports and to address points of torque. The ribs then are to be constructed of a sturdy acoustic felt that achieves the desired sound qualities of the space. By suspending three of these constructions, the valleys and peaks of the generated form work in tandem to create high points for sound to travel to for longer distant conversation and low points where small group discussion is necessary. The physical suspension of this form would be accomplished by using steel suspension cables attached to the wood frame from the exposed ceiling structure above. It must me noted that the weight of this form is not distributed evenly and would therefore require excess support at certain points. This would ensure a twisting motion would not cause the cloud to fail. This acoustic study revealed that it is possible to achieve a more stable acoustic environment and that a mass of this scale and construction method may not only be idea for this particular installation space, but for other acoustically challenged spaces as well.