Author Archives: 03 Erin Kline

We constructed our model at roughly 1/6”=1” scale. It was made out of 40 layers of laser-cut 2mm corrugated plastic, out of which were cut parametric holes which were slightly distorted squares with the approximate dimensions of 1”x1”. Added on top of these layers was a layer of plexi-glass for stability. The layers were glued together with an epoxy. 1/16” holes were drilled through vertically to thread wires. Some of these wires merely cinched the layers together while others served the double purpose of suspending the cloud. To cinch the layers, metal wire stops were soldered onto the wire on either side of the model. Inserted at the top of each column formed by the layers was acoustical foam, the idea being that in a full-scale model, sound waves would travel up these columns and be dispersed by the foam. We suspended the whole model inside of a wooden frame to best display its lighting qualities. The construction of this cloud, besides dimensions of material, would not vary at full scale.

Project B: Research+Mini Conference: Soft Geometries Group

For this project, our group researched soft geometries, and we focused on the simulation and fabrication of soft geometries within Rhino 5. We made 2 planes and made them into a mesh in Rhino 5, and applied parameters of plug-ins to create a fluid, free-form 3d form. One important aspect of this was to also make something that could be fabricated in real life through the use of panelization tools. The plug-ins we used were Grasshopper, Kangaroo, and Weaverbird.

We started out researching the types of programs available that were capable of simulation and found that the three main programs were Rhinoceros, Maya, and 3d Studio Max. Each of these high-powered programs has a slew of add-ons and plug-ins with many different special tasks to aid in the three-dimensional modeling process. As a group, we chose to further research Rhino and its capabilities because it has the Grasshopper plug-in, which interested us.

Starting in Rhino, we made a complex mesh and added points to the corners of the mesh. The complex mesh allows for more anchor points, which in turn creates more places for the mesh to be held by when it is relaxed through the simulation, creating a more dynamic simulation.

Grasshopper is a plug-in for the modeling program Rhino that allows for better and more detailed parametric design within the Rhino itself. Although Rhino is considered a “converter” tool because it easily imports and exports many different file types, Grasshopper works inside Rhino itself. Grasshopper produces geometries by assigning different objects already modeled in Rhino to different parameters that change the objects’ values or characteristics. The interface is similar to that of a flow chart or circuit with different aspects of the modeled geometries “flowing” through different parameters. The resulting forms can then be “baked” to continue the design process.

Kangaroo is a plug-in for Grasshopper that simulates forces and acts as a live physics engine for interactive simulation.  We used Kangaroo as one of the forces acting on the mesh. Another important part was to set the points of the mesh and plug them into the anchor points on kangaroo, so that when kangaroo does the simulation it sees the edges and vertices as the portions of the mesh with a force on them and the set of points as the fixed points which remain in place when the object is in motion. It produces soft, natural geometries created by simulated forces acting upon meshes, planes, points, lines, etc. For example, we could assign a mesh to be held up by the four corner anchor points and allow a simulated force similar to gravity sag the geometry and create a tensile structure when manipulated. The Unary Force was the force used to pull the shape from the fixed points, simulating a gravitational pull.

In the resulting simulation, the mesh pulls away from the anchor points, which are fixed points distorting the original mesh. This process simulates the pull of gravity on an object. This reminds me of the parachute game played in elementary school gym classes, where the students are the fixed points and the parachute is the surface pulling away.

Kangaroo Tutorial

Also available for Grasshopper, is the add-on called Weaverbird, which is essentially a powerful panelization tool. It can take organic, free form, mesh geometries baked into Rhino and create panels, which can ultimately be very easily flattened and fabricated for a seamless and feasible design. The more subdivisions created the more control one has over the project. This tool can be very useful in aiding designers in fabricating geometries that are unique. Evolute tools is another program that also will panelize an object aiding in the process of fabrication, making many parametric designs feasible. We were unable to access this program in the CGC when researching the various programs, but upon looking for an alternative we were very pleased with the abilities of Weaverbird.

Weaverbird

Erin Kline: http://ming3d.com/DAAP/ARCH3014sp2013/?p=1439

Keegan Riley: http://ming3d.com/DAAP/ARCH3014sp2013/?p=1456

Katie Honneywell: http://ming3d.com/DAAP/ARCH3014sp2013/?p=1458

Project B: Research+Mini Conference: Soft Geometries

With my group I researched soft geometries, and we focused on the simulation and fabrication of soft geometries within Rhino 5. We used Grasshopper, Kangaroo, and Weaverbird plug-ins to create the simulation and to show the importance of paneling in real-life fabrication.

Starting in Rhino, we made a complex mesh and added points to the corners of the mesh. The complex mesh allows for more anchor points, which in turn creates more places for the mesh to be held by when it is relaxed through the simulation.

Then within in Grasshopper we began to manipulate the parameters of the mesh using Kangaroo and Weaverbird. Kangaroo is a plug-in for Grasshopper that simulates forces and acts as a live physics engine for interactive simulation. Typically, Kangaroo is used for its Spring Forces parameters, and we used it to act as one of the forces acting on the mesh.

A Kangaroo Unary Force was also used to pull the shape from a single point, simulating a gravitational pull. If the force is negative it will act as a gravitational force. We set the force as positive vector allowing the mesh to form into a canopy or tent like structure.

With the relaxation simulation, the mesh begins to stretch and pull away from the anchor points distorting the original mesh. This distortion is how a soft geometry would act with the pull of gravity. A good, live example would be holding the four corners of a blanket and watching the middle sag.

With the relaxation simulation, the mesh begins to stretch and pull away from the anchor points distorting the original mesh. This distortion is how a soft geometry would act with the pull of gravity. A good, live example would be holding the four corners of a blanket and watching the middle sag.

After completing the script and playing the simulation, we then baked the tent-like soft geometry back in Rhino. Baking the form created a secondary mesh that was in the shape of the simulated form.

From there, we reopened Grasshopper and set a new mesh parameter. This when we began to focus on the functions of Weaverbird and what it can do when thinking in realistic terms of large scale fabrication. Weaverbird has multiple parameters that can subdivide the existing mesh, creating a panel like system that can later be unrolled for fabrication purposes.

Weaverbird allows for triangulation, as well as a polygon subdivision. The more parameters that are used the smaller the subdivisions become, which also allows for a smoother, more rounded mesh.

In our tutorial, which will be shown in class, we show two ways of using Weaverbird to thicken a mesh that is paneled through the triangulation and subdivision tools. In both we use Weaverbird transformation tools, Picture Frame and Window. The one closest in the image is using the Picture Frame tool, while the one in the back is using Window. The Window creates a pillow like structure and the Picture Frame creates a framed system.

Using these tools and parameters allows for realistic fabrication patterns for large-scale productions, like the skin of a building or a curved roof, in which case 3D printing would not be feasible.

As students we often create curvilinear forms without actually thinking about the methods for constructing such a shape, but Kangaroo and Weaverbird (as well as other programs) provide an easy, parametric way of producing such forms out of flat paneled surfaces.

Project A Phase 2: Final Presentation – acoustacks

Group: Erin Kline, Jessie Werbeach, Robert Hubbard, Paul Conover

Work Cited (all acoustic facts came from one source):

Cavanaugh, William J., and Gregory C. Tucci. Architectural Acoustics: Principles and Practice. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, 2010. Print.

Project A Phase 2: Schematic Design

Group: Erin Kline, Jessie Werbeach, Paul Conover, Robert Hubbard

Project A Phase 2: Concept Sketches

Group: Erin Kline, Jessie Werbeach, Robert Hubbard, and Paul Conover

p1_ErinKline_03

DAW / Double Agent White | Atelier Calder | Sache, France | July 7-8th 2012

Marc Fornes worked on the installation, Double Agent White, while participating in a residence at Atelier CALDER. The installation is composed of nine intersecting spheres, and each sphere has a unique radii. The design of the installation and the precise intersection of the spheres give the piece its structural stability.

DAW gives the sense that is morphing as it is being viewed because of the unique radii of each sphere and how those spheres are arranged. It appears as if one is moving into another. It creates a fourth dimension, time. It is as if the spheres are moving and changing through the passage of time.

DAW I feel is also relevant to the project within this course because of how the form itself gives the piece structure and stability. The partitions in the project need to be able to stand alone with no extra support. If the design of the tessellation or detail within the partition can make it free standing and stable that is an important thing to recognize.

http://theverymany.com/constructs/12-atelier-calder/