Author Archives: 04 AJ Suever

Tidal Wall

AJ Suever | Rebecca Doughty | Mary Wischmeyer | Theresa Bort

We approached the design of this partition intending to create two different localized functions and aesthetics, one on each side of the wall. One side serves as a structural frame for the eight foot partition. Its flat regularized surface provides pin up and critique space, while absorbing extraneous sound through the concavity of the cones on that side. The other side is intended to trap sound in a larger group setting. The surface is made up of a series of varying convex cones, which provide significant depth variation to trap sound.

Our group experimented with reactive forms in Maya, building cones that opened and extended based on their proximity to a chosen point. We set the point at eye level so the visual gradient will have the most effect on the viewer. We then refined the design using paneling tools in Rhino to create a more regularized design that grows radially outward from that same point. The red octagons play off the red beams in Niehoff Studio and provide a visual spine that anchors the evolving white pyramids.

004_Acoustic Wall Submission

AJ SUEVER, REBECCA DOUGHTY, THERESA BORT, MARY WISCHMEYER
THIS SHOWS THE VERSATILITY OF OUR WALL. IT CAN BE BROKEN APART SO THAT IT CAN BE CONFIGURED IN EITHER AN S-SHAPE OR AN C-SHAPE. THE S-SHAPE GIVES THE BENEFITS OF A 2 SIDED SHAPE WHERE BOTH SIDES COULD BE USED FOR SMALLER INDIVIDUAL CRITS. THE C-SHAPE GIVES THE BENEFIT OF MAXIMUM SOUND ABSORPTION FOR EITHER LARGER CRITS OR A SOUND ABSORBING PANEL BEHIND THE CRIT.
THE PARAMETRIC DESIGN VARIES THE DEPTH OF EACH POLYGON AS WELL AS THE SIZE OF THE ROTATED SQUARES ON THE BACK OF THE PANEL. THE OCTAGONS SERVE AS A STRUCTURE SPINE THROUGH THE WALL.

P1_AJ Suever_04

This installation named Slipstream was created for the Bridge Gallery in New York. It has been said to look like hair, but the goal was to 3-dimensionally represent the flow of water through the translation of 2-dimensional digital drawings into 3-dimensional space. A major goal of the installation was to contradict the normal vision of architecture and challenge the idea of solid stable structure.

The installation is made out of brightly colored plywood pieces slotted together. The idea behind the linear extrusions of the plywood was to create a visual filter.

I find the installation is interesting because it approaches the idea of defining space in a unique way. I think it successfully creates a sense of motion and fluidity with a very flat, motionless object like plywood.

Although the description of this installation did not mention that it was based on parametric design, I believe it could have been. If not, the idea behind this installation could easily be translated into parametric design where the direction, size and angle of the pieces could be manipulated.

http://www.evolo.us/architecture/slipstream-installation-translates-2d-drawing-into-3d-structure/#more-20419