Author Archives: Joyce Hanlon

Final Presentation

Midterm Review

My design is based around a theme of weightlessness, and the relationship between floating planes and frames detaching themselves from grounding masses.  Direction is clear and wayfinding simple, but it still allows for deviation from the course and winding paths.

Lindner Center : Project 2 Model Photos

Lindner Center Metaphor

Very well, let’s take a walk.  At the base of the structure, as any flame, is the concentration of energy that is released and dispersed upward.  The combustion of this energy occurs when the ambler is compressed at the cave-like entrance and then immediately released into a bright white, 5-story atrium space.  The dispersion of energy equates to the privacy of the upper floors, the quieter spaces that seem to float freely above the crowded and heavy ground floor.  This process occurs as a result of the entire population entering at either the basement or main floor levels.  As the most common direction to pass is upward, the location of highest traffic and therefore energy will be the ground level.  This is also the floor that exudes school spirit in the history literally written on the walls and the trophy case adorning the walkway, all factors contributing to its high energy level.

This flame-like quality translates directly into the tectonic design first and foremost with the ground level environment.  The ambler is compressed at the entrance, this time laterally rather than vertically as the narrow entrance is revealed between two massive forms.  Like the Lindner Center, the construct offers massive enclosure on the first floor, correlating to the paralyzing heat of a flame center that disperses and dissipates upward just like the structure’s weightless levels floating above.  This flame flickers light and releases embers, extending itself outward into its environment as the structure engages the exterior with clearly framed views.  And just as the flame gracefully reaches into the sky and disappears, so does the building as it diminishes and opens as it rises.

Finally, a flame is balanced.  Though it is constantly undergoing combustion, it is aesthetically and chemically balanced.  It is roughly symmetrical as it radiates from a core energy source at the base.  Similarly, the structure maintains a balance around its base in the form of two corresponding frame masses.

Lindner Center

Very well, let’s take a walk.  At the base, like any flame, is the concentration of energy that is released and dispersed upward.  The combustion of this energy occurs when the ambler is compressed at the cave-like entrance and then immediately released into a bright white, 5-story atrium space.  The dispersion of energy equates to the privacy of the upper floors, the quieter spaces that seem to float freely above the crowded and heavy ground floor.  This process occurs as the entire population enters at either the basement or main floor levels; as the most common direction to pass is upward, the location of highest traffic and therefore energy will be the ground level.  This is also the floor that exudes school spirit in the history literally written on the walls and trophy case adorning the walkway, all factors contributing to its high energy level.

Very well, let’s take a walk.  Picture dropping a marble off a roof and watching it strike the ground below.  It will freefall gracefully and silently until that final instant when its momentum completely shifts direction and it explodes back upward.  This drastic change relates to the dramatic change between the ground floor used frequently by students as a passage through campus, and the private remaining 4 floors used only by faculty.  The marble’s passage knows all levels above the contact point as peaceful no matter how many times it bounces; the impact point will always be the most dramatic moment.  Similarly, the first floor is always the most utilized level by noisy, passing students, and even the color scheme of the black floor and walls is unique to the high-energy ground floor.

Very well, let’s take a walk.  A spool of ribbon falls onto the floor and lightly bounces but continues most of its momentum laterally as it unrolls its content onto the floor.  This relates to the athletic center’s balance of vertical and horizontal forces as its long, simple, single hallway form establishes a clear lateral direction while its five-story height opens it up vertically.  Just as the falling ribbon reveals, however, the majority of the noise, energy, and movement occurs along the base floor rather than along any one of those above it.